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Doctoral Film Club - vote for the film!

Doctoral Film Club - vote for the film!

The Culture Commission of the Jagiellonian University’s PhD Student Association invites you to choose which film we will watch during the next edition of the Doctoral Students’ Film Club, which will take place on Thursday April 21st.

You can vote up through Sunday April 10th using the following link: 

 


https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=6yYO676_0keekOvSQm286wxTh_JU6N1Il-DkI3-NpP1UM1QyUjNUTk0wOFhBNDdaRkZHOEYwSDhXRC4u
 

This time, you can vote for the following films: 


Sonata, dir. Bartosz Blaschke, Poland, 2022 

 

Thanks to the persistence of his parents (Małgorzata Foremniak, Łukasz Simlat), the support of several good people, and an operation by Professor Henryk Skarżyński (Jerzy Stuhr), Gregorz Płonka (Michał Sikorski) regains his hearing after being deaf for many years. Now, he is able to pursue his greatest dream: that of playing Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. 

 

Cyrano, dir. Joe Wright, USA, Canada, United Kingdom, 2021 

 

The eponymous protagonist of this film (Peter Dinklage of Game of Thrones fame) is a respected citizen who is widely admired for the skill with which he uses both the word and the rapier. Cyrano, however, is concerned that his appearance will make him unworthy of the stunning Roxanne (Haley Bennett).  


In Cyrano, director Joe Wright (Pride and Prejudice, Atonement, and Anna Karenina), the winner of numerous awards who has been called a master of period pieces, interprets this timeless story about a heartbreaking love triangle anew. His film's set design, polished costumes, and engaging songs (the most recent adaptation of the seventeenth-century celebrity's fate is a musical) are all impressive. 

  

 

The Lost Daughter, dir. Maggie Gyllenhaal, USA, 2021 

 

Leda (Oscar nominee Olivia Colman) goes to Greece on holiday. She plans on reading, relaxing on the beach, and enjoying her time off. However, the calm of her cozy resort is interrupted by the arrival of an eccentric family that lives in the biggest villa on the island. Leda's attention above all shifts to Nina (Dakota Johnson), who is struggling with the difficulties of being a young mother. Observing this mysterious stranger evokes memories from Leda’s own motherhood, with which she had not been able to deal for years. Memories and ghosts of the past come back to her.

Maggie Gyllenhaal’s film is one of the most provocative films in recent years. The director is not afraid of asking difficult questions about the essence of motherhood and its impact on the life of a woman. Is it possible for a woman to not have a maternal instinct? If children are not most important in her life, more so than her career and her own ambitions, does this make her a bad mother? And, finally, to quote one review: “Must motherhood be a full-time job? If a job is not satisfying or fulfilling, can we simply quit?” The end product is an unusual psychological drama that pulls at the heartstrings from the very beginning up through the end credits.

The Lost Daughter is a dramatic tour-de-force. Olivia Colman and Jessie Buckley are outstanding in their portrayals of Leda, the main protagonist, as is Dakota Johnson, who had never before played such an intimate role. The film co-stars Ed Harris and Dagmara Domińczyk, a Polish actress who has been successful in Hollywood. The film has received or been nominated for dozens of awards (including the award for the best screenplay at the Venice Film Festival) and was one of the most serious contenders at this year’s Oscars.